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National Blood Week 2015 – Supporting NHS Blood Banks

The NHS run various awareness days and weeks throughout the year and also support wider global awareness programmes. These are designed to make important topics more visible to the general public. They may promote good practices such as diet or support schemes for mental health. They may also promote the great work taking place in the NHS that sometimes goes unnoticed by the wider public.

One such UK led campaign is National Blood Week, which takes place between 8th and 14th June, culminating with a tie in with World Blood Donor Day on 14th June. National Blood Week includes a programme of events and initiatives aimed at getting more people to give blood for the first time and also encouraging lapsed donors to consider giving again on a regular basis.

NHS Blood are aiming to attract a further 204,000 donors through a broad range of activities. This number is designed to ensure that the service has sufficient, sustainable supplies and coverage across all of the main blood groups.

The central message of the campaign is that giving blood only takes an hour and makes the donor feel really good about themselves and what they have done. The campaign is being communicated across all media, including a clever PR campaign where O’s A’s and B’s have been removed (with permission) from famous and prominent signs across the country. This is to signify diminishing supplies blood types of those letters. This has generated a lot of coverage and activity in social media using the #MissingType hashtag and is helping to attract a younger audience, who are active on social media and can quickly spread the message using different channels.

Health Service Discounts supports NHS awareness days and initiatives such as National Blood Week that help to promote the exceptional work taking place in the NHS. Importantly  our team were out doing their bit for‪ #‎Nationalbloodweek‬ and donating 5 pints of the good stuff.

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Image Credits:
Image by Andrew Mason via Flickr

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